ICRI News

A new Deloitte Access Economics report has calculated the total asset value of the Great Barrier Reef to be $56 billion, assessing the World Heritage site’s economic, social and iconic brand value together in one study for the first time.

In the report commissioned by the Great Barrier Reef Foundation with support from National Australia Bank and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, Deloitte Access Economics analysed the Reef’s:

The International Co-ordinating Council of UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere Programme (MAB) has added 20 new sites to the World Network of Biosphere Reserves, bringing their total number to 651 sites, including 15 transboundary sites, in 120 countries. Myanmar had its first biosphere reserve inscribed this year. These additions were made by the Council during a meeting taking place in Paris from 8 to 12 June. One new site, in Indonesia, contains mangroves and coral reefs:

UNESCO’s World Heritage Centre released the first global scientific assessment of climate change impacts on World Heritage coral reefs. Soaring ocean temperatures in the past three years have subjected 21 of 29 World Heritage reefs to severe and/or repeated heat stress, and caused some of the worst bleaching ever observed at iconic sites like the Great Barrier Reef (Australia), Papahānaumokuākea (USA), the Lagoons of New Caledonia (France) and Aldabra Atoll (Seychelles). The analysis predicts that all 29 coral-containing World Heritage sites would cease to exist as functioning coral reef ecosystems by the end of this century under a business-as-usual emissions scenario.

Using the opportunity provided by the Great Barrier Submit - Managing for resilience, Hosted by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority in Townsville, Australia, UN Environment and the ICRI Secretariat organized a one day consultation on the Global Coral Reef Monitoring Networks (GCRMN). The meeting was very well attended by Australian organizations including the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS), the Great Barrier Reef Foundation (GBRF), the Australian Coral Reef Society, the James Cook University, the Department of the Environment and Energy, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT). Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) also joined also the meeting.

New York, 9 June—The 193 Member States of the United Nations unanimously agreed to a set of measures that will begin the reversal of the decline of the ocean’s health as the five-day Ocean Conference concluded this afternoon. The outcome document, together with more than 1,300 commitments to action, marks a breakthrough in the global approach to the management and conservation of the ocean.

The Ocean Conference, the first UN conference of its kind on the issue has raised global consciousness of ocean problems ranging from marine pollution to illegal and over fishing, from ocean acidification to lack of high seas governance. By including all stakeholders in the discussions, the Conference produced a comprehensive and actionable range of solutions.

A blueprint to respond to coral bleaching and other recent impacts on the Great Barrier Reef was the focus of this week’s two-day Reef Summit in Townsville, Australia.

Hosted by the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority, the summit — Managing for resilience— was the first of its kind for the Reef and involved more than 70 leading marine experts from around the world.

It was a response to unprecedented back-to-back coral bleaching events on the Great Barrier Reef and aimed at determining what else could be done in addition to the already extensive actions being undertaken to protect the Reef.

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